Sadhbh Walshe Online
Red Hook is one of several jurisdictions training community leaders in peacemaking
In New York, employment agencies face few penalties for charging advance fees for jobs that don’€™t exist”/>

In New York, employment agencies face few penalties for charging advance fees for jobs that don’€™t exist

Small town America turns into a war zone.

Barring people with criminal records from certain jobs is unproductive and unjust
Human Trafficking Intervention Courts offer help and hope to prostitution defendants across the state
aljazeeraamerica:

NYC looks beyond Bloomberg’s era of inequality 

On the tree-lined intersection of Park Avenue and 95th Street in New York’s ritzy Upper East Side, a doorman hails a cab for a Fendi-bag-toting resident of one of the avenue’s many iconic luxury apartment buildings.
Just a few blocks north, the multimillion-dollar co-ops give way to the damp and dreary housing projects of Harlem. Here there are no doormen to help the harried-looking women get their strollers down the subway steps. It’s a no-frills world where simply having a job, even one that barely pays the rent, is considered a vital lifeline.
Marissa, a single mother of three who looks a lot older than her 34 years, took a cigarette break outside a Pathmark store where she works for the minimum wage of $7.25 an hour. Marissa, who declined to give her last name, has to rely on food stamps to keep her children fed, but after having “done time” in the city’s shelter system, she is grateful to at least be able to make rent.

Read more at Al Jazeera America
Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

aljazeeraamerica:

NYC looks beyond Bloomberg’s era of inequality 

On the tree-lined intersection of Park Avenue and 95th Street in New York’s ritzy Upper East Side, a doorman hails a cab for a Fendi-bag-toting resident of one of the avenue’s many iconic luxury apartment buildings.

Just a few blocks north, the multimillion-dollar co-ops give way to the damp and dreary housing projects of Harlem. Here there are no doormen to help the harried-looking women get their strollers down the subway steps. It’s a no-frills world where simply having a job, even one that barely pays the rent, is considered a vital lifeline.

Marissa, a single mother of three who looks a lot older than her 34 years, took a cigarette break outside a Pathmark store where she works for the minimum wage of $7.25 an hour. Marissa, who declined to give her last name, has to rely on food stamps to keep her children fed, but after having “done time” in the city’s shelter system, she is grateful to at least be able to make rent.

Read more at Al Jazeera America

Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

aljazeeraamerica:

NYC looks beyond Bloomberg’s era of inequality 

On the tree-lined intersection of Park Avenue and 95th Street in New York’s ritzy Upper East Side, a doorman hails a cab for a Fendi-bag-toting resident of one of the avenue’s many iconic luxury apartment buildings.
Just a few blocks north, the multimillion-dollar co-ops give way to the damp and dreary housing projects of Harlem. Here there are no doormen to help the harried-looking women get their strollers down the subway steps. It’s a no-frills world where simply having a job, even one that barely pays the rent, is considered a vital lifeline.
Marissa, a single mother of three who looks a lot older than her 34 years, took a cigarette break outside a Pathmark store where she works for the minimum wage of $7.25 an hour. Marissa, who declined to give her last name, has to rely on food stamps to keep her children fed, but after having “done time” in the city’s shelter system, she is grateful to at least be able to make rent.

Read more at Al Jazeera America
Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

aljazeeraamerica:

NYC looks beyond Bloomberg’s era of inequality 

On the tree-lined intersection of Park Avenue and 95th Street in New York’s ritzy Upper East Side, a doorman hails a cab for a Fendi-bag-toting resident of one of the avenue’s many iconic luxury apartment buildings.

Just a few blocks north, the multimillion-dollar co-ops give way to the damp and dreary housing projects of Harlem. Here there are no doormen to help the harried-looking women get their strollers down the subway steps. It’s a no-frills world where simply having a job, even one that barely pays the rent, is considered a vital lifeline.

Marissa, a single mother of three who looks a lot older than her 34 years, took a cigarette break outside a Pathmark store where she works for the minimum wage of $7.25 an hour. Marissa, who declined to give her last name, has to rely on food stamps to keep her children fed, but after having “done time” in the city’s shelter system, she is grateful to at least be able to make rent.

Read more at Al Jazeera America

Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

I have a friend who is quite rich. Like a lot of rich people, he’s very careful with his money, by which I mean that he’s constantly shifting it around to make sure it’s maximizing its potential.Sometimes, all this shifting about will mean his checking ac