Sadhbh Walshe Online
Barring people with criminal records from certain jobs is unproductive and unjust
Human Trafficking Intervention Courts offer help and hope to prostitution defendants across the state
aljazeeraamerica:

NYC looks beyond Bloomberg’s era of inequality 

On the tree-lined intersection of Park Avenue and 95th Street in New York’s ritzy Upper East Side, a doorman hails a cab for a Fendi-bag-toting resident of one of the avenue’s many iconic luxury apartment buildings.
Just a few blocks north, the multimillion-dollar co-ops give way to the damp and dreary housing projects of Harlem. Here there are no doormen to help the harried-looking women get their strollers down the subway steps. It’s a no-frills world where simply having a job, even one that barely pays the rent, is considered a vital lifeline.
Marissa, a single mother of three who looks a lot older than her 34 years, took a cigarette break outside a Pathmark store where she works for the minimum wage of $7.25 an hour. Marissa, who declined to give her last name, has to rely on food stamps to keep her children fed, but after having “done time” in the city’s shelter system, she is grateful to at least be able to make rent.

Read more at Al Jazeera America
Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

aljazeeraamerica:

NYC looks beyond Bloomberg’s era of inequality 

On the tree-lined intersection of Park Avenue and 95th Street in New York’s ritzy Upper East Side, a doorman hails a cab for a Fendi-bag-toting resident of one of the avenue’s many iconic luxury apartment buildings.

Just a few blocks north, the multimillion-dollar co-ops give way to the damp and dreary housing projects of Harlem. Here there are no doormen to help the harried-looking women get their strollers down the subway steps. It’s a no-frills world where simply having a job, even one that barely pays the rent, is considered a vital lifeline.

Marissa, a single mother of three who looks a lot older than her 34 years, took a cigarette break outside a Pathmark store where she works for the minimum wage of $7.25 an hour. Marissa, who declined to give her last name, has to rely on food stamps to keep her children fed, but after having “done time” in the city’s shelter system, she is grateful to at least be able to make rent.

Read more at Al Jazeera America

Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

aljazeeraamerica:

NYC looks beyond Bloomberg’s era of inequality 

On the tree-lined intersection of Park Avenue and 95th Street in New York’s ritzy Upper East Side, a doorman hails a cab for a Fendi-bag-toting resident of one of the avenue’s many iconic luxury apartment buildings.
Just a few blocks north, the multimillion-dollar co-ops give way to the damp and dreary housing projects of Harlem. Here there are no doormen to help the harried-looking women get their strollers down the subway steps. It’s a no-frills world where simply having a job, even one that barely pays the rent, is considered a vital lifeline.
Marissa, a single mother of three who looks a lot older than her 34 years, took a cigarette break outside a Pathmark store where she works for the minimum wage of $7.25 an hour. Marissa, who declined to give her last name, has to rely on food stamps to keep her children fed, but after having “done time” in the city’s shelter system, she is grateful to at least be able to make rent.

Read more at Al Jazeera America
Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

aljazeeraamerica:

NYC looks beyond Bloomberg’s era of inequality 

On the tree-lined intersection of Park Avenue and 95th Street in New York’s ritzy Upper East Side, a doorman hails a cab for a Fendi-bag-toting resident of one of the avenue’s many iconic luxury apartment buildings.

Just a few blocks north, the multimillion-dollar co-ops give way to the damp and dreary housing projects of Harlem. Here there are no doormen to help the harried-looking women get their strollers down the subway steps. It’s a no-frills world where simply having a job, even one that barely pays the rent, is considered a vital lifeline.

Marissa, a single mother of three who looks a lot older than her 34 years, took a cigarette break outside a Pathmark store where she works for the minimum wage of $7.25 an hour. Marissa, who declined to give her last name, has to rely on food stamps to keep her children fed, but after having “done time” in the city’s shelter system, she is grateful to at least be able to make rent.

Read more at Al Jazeera America

Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

I have a friend who is quite rich. Like a lot of rich people, he’s very careful with his money, by which I mean that he’s constantly shifting it around to make sure it’s maximizing its potential.Sometimes, all this shifting about will mean his checking ac
If you’ve ever been arrested for a misdemeanor offense, like jumping a turnstile, smoking a joint, or protesting a cause in a way the authorities would rather you didn’t, then you’ll know that your best chance of avoiding jail has less to do with what you
When prison illness becomes a death sentence

Terrell_griswold_pic
Terrell Griswold, who died, aged 26, while serving a three-year sentence in Bent County Correctional Facility, Colorado.

On 28 October 2010, Lagalia Afola received a phone call from the Bent County Correctional Facility, a private prison operated by the Correctional Corporation of America (CCA), informing her that her 26-year-old son, Terrell Griswold, was dead. Terrell was serving a three-year sentence for burglary and was due to be released in early 2011. Sadly for him, and for his grieving family, he never made it home.

The autopsy report stated that Terrell died as a result of “hypertensive cardiovascular disease” and that he had a clinical history of hypertension, for which he refused to take medication. His mother found this conclusion hard to accept and, after months of persistent enquiry, was finally provided with at least some of her son’s medical records. Upon reviewing the records, she discovered that her son had been suffering from a blockage in his prostrate that prevented him from urinating properly, causing chronic kidney damage, and which, she believes, ultimately contributed to his abrupt demise.

This blockage in Terrell’s prostrate was discovered on 3 December 2009 by Dr David Oba, an attending physician at the CCA prison. The doctor noted at the time that inmate Griswold reported having had problems passing urine for the past two months:

"He has the urge to void but sometimes is unable to void at all, other times he has a very weak stream but is able to void."

The doctor also noted that he had discussed with the patient that “he may have a chronic sub-acute prostatitis”, which he planned to treat with a 30-day cycle of ciprofloxacin (Cipro). If there was no improvement he wrote that “he may need an eval [sic] with cystoscope with urology.”

According to the records seen (pdf), Terrell was never treated by an urologist during his entire stay at the CCA facility, and it appears he did not receive the Cipro for almost six months. On 27 January 2010, Terrell had a follow-up visit with a nurse. The nurse’s report of the visit reads as follows:

READ MORE

Inside Story: the US Prison System
Prison_bars

The Guardian Newspaper has begun a new series that examines what life is like inside American prisons.  If you have ever been in prison, have a  family member in prison or are currently in prison and would like to share your experience, please write to:

Sadhbh Walshe

PO Box 1466

New York, NY 10150

Or send an email to: sadhbh@ymail.com

Why California’s prisoners are starving for solitary change

Californian prisoners have repeatedly gone on hunger strike over the solitary confinement in which some spend decades

Corcoran

On 19 December 2011, three prisoners at Corcoran State Prison wrote a letter to the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) threatening to go on hunger strike if improvements were not made to their living conditions. Evidently, they received no response from the CDCR: the hunger strike began on 28 December.

This latest hunger strike, the third in less than six months, is small potatoes compared to the previous two, which were state-wide and involved thousands of inmates. According to Terry Thornton, a CDCR spokeswoman, it may already be over. But the fact that Californian prisoners have once again resorted to starving themselves to protest the conditions of their confinement does suggest that something is rotten in the Golden State’s penal system. 

The first hunger strike began on 1 July 2011, and ended three weeks later when the CDCR agreed, in theory at least, to address the participants’ five core demands, which amounted to better living conditions, adequate food and clothing, an end to group punishments and most importantly, an end to the gang validation policy that sentences inmates to endless terms in solitary confinement cells, known as SHUs.

One of my correspondents, Anthony, who has an indeterminate SHU sentence (meaning, there’s no end in sight), described to me in a letter what it is about the SHU environment he and his fellow inmates find hard to tolerate.

"We’re entitled to receive 10 hours of ‘outdoor exercise’ a week, but lucky if we get half that. At times, we’re cooped up an entire week in our cells before the opportunity of expanding our lungs with fresh air. ‘Outdoor exercise’ consists of being placed in a dog kennel-like cage, no bigger than our cells. We’re prohibited from all recreational and exercise equipment, compelling most to pace idly back and forth.

"Blinding bright lights remain on 24 hours a day within our (windowless 8ft x 10ft) cells as we have been denied control over them. Our lavatories are electronically installed, allotting each cell two flushes every 15 minutes."

Continue Reading